Dr. Robotic: The Minimally Invasive Mastermind!

Diseased organs disappear with nary a scar! Heartburn defeated with the power of magnets! Battling obesity around the world, Santiago Horgan, MD is … Dr. Robotic!

By day, a dapper Argentinean and world traveler who loves espresso, Hermès ties, and well made shoes. But when he dons his surgical mask he becomes Dr. Robotic!

Dr. Robotic is a hero of minimally invasive surgery. He masterminded Natural Orifice Translumenal Endoscopic Surgery or NOTES, a technique that uses natural body openings to removed diseased organs with little to no scarring. He was, in fact, the first surgeon in the United States to painlessly remove an appendix through the mouth!

Powered by futuristic robotic technologies, he was also the first doctor in the United States to remove a diseased gallbladder through a patient’s belly button with a new FDA-approved single-incision robotic system. But he doesn’t stop there!

Using the attraction of magnets, Dr. Robotic tames gastric esophageal reflux disease (GERD). He implants a flexible chain of rare earth magnets around the lower esophagus, effectively blocking the backwards flow of stomach acids. No more purple pills!

For the people he’s helped we just want to say, domo arigato, Dr. Robotic, domo.

Santiago Horgan, MD is … Dr.Robotic!

The Adventures of Tele-Man!
With resources shrinking at every turn and the nearest trauma center hundreds of miles away, citizens in remotes areas of the country were living in fear. What if Johnny had a stroke? What if little Mary Jane delivered her baby early? How can someone be at two places at once, when the need is great and there is no time to spare?
Have no fear, Tele-Man is here!
Dr. Brett C. Meyer, a cunning stroke neurologist, heard the cries from the needy and answered them with Telemedicine! 
Through the use of embedded video technology, covalently bonded to his skeleton, Tele-Man can use cameras and computer screens to virtually transport himself immediately to remote areas in need. In essence telemedicine can allow him to be in two places at once!
Anywhere, anytime, patients can get the care they need through the amazing technology of a “computer” screen.   Lending a helping hand to caring practitioners in cities far, far, away, Tele-Man is there. Current telemedicine technologies allow Tele-Man to utilize the Internet to enable high quality data, video and audio transmission in real time, from one provider to another, almost irrespective of distance. 
“The power of technology is awesome.  Using telemedicine, I can not only see what is happening in a far-away place, I can in essence virtually be there to potentially save the day.”
Being able to see, what others may not see, Tele-Man is there.
“Patients are in need of expert assistance and care providers may not have immediate access to this expertise, so that is where telemedicine can make a huge difference.”  “If I could hook up an Internet line, I may even be able to provide tele-stroke care to my home planet of TELEON…. although that would require an Ethernet cable of 780,000 light years in length.”  
But until such as time …
Guiding medical care, evil diseases beware, Tele-Man is there!

The Adventures of Tele-Man!

With resources shrinking at every turn and the nearest trauma center hundreds of miles away, citizens in remotes areas of the country were living in fear. What if Johnny had a stroke? What if little Mary Jane delivered her baby early? How can someone be at two places at once, when the need is great and there is no time to spare?

Have no fear, Tele-Man is here!

Dr. Brett C. Meyer, a cunning stroke neurologist, heard the cries from the needy and answered them with Telemedicine!

Through the use of embedded video technology, covalently bonded to his skeleton, Tele-Man can use cameras and computer screens to virtually transport himself immediately to remote areas in need. In essence telemedicine can allow him to be in two places at once!

Anywhere, anytime, patients can get the care they need through the amazing technology of a “computer” screen.   Lending a helping hand to caring practitioners in cities far, far, away, Tele-Man is there. Current telemedicine technologies allow Tele-Man to utilize the Internet to enable high quality data, video and audio transmission in real time, from one provider to another, almost irrespective of distance. 

“The power of technology is awesome.  Using telemedicine, I can not only see what is happening in a far-away place, I can in essence virtually be there to potentially save the day.”

Being able to see, what others may not see, Tele-Man is there.

“Patients are in need of expert assistance and care providers may not have immediate access to this expertise, so that is where telemedicine can make a huge difference.” 
 
“If I could hook up an Internet line, I may even be able to provide tele-stroke care to my home planet of TELEON…. although that would require an Ethernet cable of 780,000 light years in length.” 

But until such as time …

Guiding medical care, evil diseases beware, Tele-Man is there!

Of Spiders and Men
In Stan Lee’s iconic comic book series, The Amazing Spider-man, high school milquetoast Peter Parker is bitten by a radioactive spider, transforming the teen-ager into a super hero with “the agility and proportionate strength of an arachnid.”
Could a spider bite imbue the victim with the ability to climb walls, cling to ceilings and swing from silken threads? According to Richard Clark, MD, director in the Division of Medical Toxicology for UC San Diego Health System and medical director for the Poison Control Center, San Diego Division, no.
All spiders have venom, but only a few have fangs that can pierce human skin. And the ones that do aren’t radioactive. 
In San Diego, home to Comic-Con and aspiring super heroes from all corners of the world, the only spider that poses a potential threat is the black widow spider, or Latrodectus mactans. “The bite of a black widow spider, which can also be brown or red, can lead to severe pain, neurological symptoms, nausea and vomiting but generally does not cause much skin damage,” said Clark.
Nausea and vomiting, possible; “catching thieves just like flies?” Not likely.
If you are bitten by a spider, instead of waiting to see if you “can spin a web, any size” Clark recommends good wound care. “Good wound care is the most important treatment for most spider bites.  Some can lead to infections that may need antibiotics or a tetanus booster. Severe black widow bites may require pain medication and sometimes an antidote for the venom called anti-venom that needs to be given in an emergency department.”
Now, gamma rays: that might be the ticket …

Of Spiders and Men

In Stan Lee’s iconic comic book series, The Amazing Spider-man, high school milquetoast Peter Parker is bitten by a radioactive spider, transforming the teen-ager into a super hero with “the agility and proportionate strength of an arachnid.”

Could a spider bite imbue the victim with the ability to climb walls, cling to ceilings and swing from silken threads? According to Richard Clark, MD, director in the Division of Medical Toxicology for UC San Diego Health System and medical director for the Poison Control Center, San Diego Division, no.

All spiders have venom, but only a few have fangs that can pierce human skin. And the ones that do aren’t radioactive. 

In San Diego, home to Comic-Con and aspiring super heroes from all corners of the world, the only spider that poses a potential threat is the black widow spider, or Latrodectus mactans. “The bite of a black widow spider, which can also be brown or red, can lead to severe pain, neurological symptoms, nausea and vomiting but generally does not cause much skin damage,” said Clark.

Nausea and vomiting, possible; “catching thieves just like flies?” Not likely.

If you are bitten by a spider, instead of waiting to see if you “can spin a web, any size” Clark recommends good wound care. “Good wound care is the most important treatment for most spider bites.  Some can lead to infections that may need antibiotics or a tetanus booster. Severe black widow bites may require pain medication and sometimes an antidote for the venom called anti-venom that needs to be given in an emergency department.”

Now, gamma rays: that might be the ticket …

About

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