Parasitic giant roundworms (Ascaris lumbricoides) extracted from an infected Kenyan child. Photo courtesy of J. Gathany.
Worm limits
Being infected by parasitic helminths or worms isn’t just a Third World problem. It’s a global phenomenon. Example: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says an estimated 576 to 740 million people around the world are infected by hookworms alone. In the United States, the most common worm parasite is Enterobius vermicularis or the pinworm.
A new study in the UK, however, offers this upside to being infected: If you’re carrying one type of parasite, your risk of catching a second infection may be less.
Cardiff researchers analyzed data from school-age children in Tanzania infected with the most common forms of parasitic worms: giant roundworm (Ascaris lumbricoides), roundworm (Trichuris trichiura) and the aforementioned hookworm, of which there are two species that commonly infect humans.
They found that co-infection is a very important risk factor, sometimes more important than any other factor, such as a child’s living conditions, behavior and gender. Sometimes the risk of a second infection increases with the first, but not always.
The discovery has practical import. It more fully explains the relative risks of co-infection – when a person carries more than one parasite species – and suggests that efforts to control infections may need to be fine-tuned so that resources are not wasted targeting the wrong things.

Parasitic giant roundworms (Ascaris lumbricoides) extracted from an infected Kenyan child. Photo courtesy of J. Gathany.

Worm limits

Being infected by parasitic helminths or worms isn’t just a Third World problem. It’s a global phenomenon. Example: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says an estimated 576 to 740 million people around the world are infected by hookworms alone. In the United States, the most common worm parasite is Enterobius vermicularis or the pinworm.

A new study in the UK, however, offers this upside to being infected: If you’re carrying one type of parasite, your risk of catching a second infection may be less.

Cardiff researchers analyzed data from school-age children in Tanzania infected with the most common forms of parasitic worms: giant roundworm (Ascaris lumbricoides), roundworm (Trichuris trichiura) and the aforementioned hookworm, of which there are two species that commonly infect humans.

They found that co-infection is a very important risk factor, sometimes more important than any other factor, such as a child’s living conditions, behavior and gender. Sometimes the risk of a second infection increases with the first, but not always.

The discovery has practical import. It more fully explains the relative risks of co-infection – when a person carries more than one parasite species – and suggests that efforts to control infections may need to be fine-tuned so that resources are not wasted targeting the wrong things.

Notes

  1. eyehatekim reblogged this from ucsdhealthsciences
  2. whatthefuckdierdre reblogged this from ucsdhealthsciences
  3. arcanamortis reblogged this from ucsdhealthsciences
  4. amsocparasit reblogged this from ucsdhealthsciences
  5. y2ycenter reblogged this from ucsdhealthsciences
  6. tokillthedragon reblogged this from alpacamedic
  7. alpacamedic reblogged this from ucsdhealthsciences
  8. bugcthulhu reblogged this from ucsdhealthsciences
  9. igottheclap reblogged this from ucsdhealthsciences
  10. mamashealth reblogged this from ucsdhealthsciences
  11. raimaokfri reblogged this from pubhealth
  12. yeyshonan reblogged this from ucsdhealthsciences
  13. idokph reblogged this from pubhealth
  14. constructivee-destructionn reblogged this from ucsdhealthsciences
  15. jurnalramadhan reblogged this from pubhealth and added:
    Eebuseeet, bisa ampe sepanjang itu… O_o
  16. mischmasched reblogged this from pubhealth and added:
    Naasty
  17. pubhealth reblogged this from ucsdhealthsciences
  18. doo-da-diddy-diddy-dum-diddy-doo reblogged this from ucsdhealthsciences
  19. burdentheories reblogged this from ucsdhealthsciences
  20. thekingoflegoland reblogged this from ucsdhealthsciences
  21. gisanonymous reblogged this from ucsdhealthsciences
  22. urielrockrocker reblogged this from ucsdhealthsciences
  23. nocturnalnurse reblogged this from defibrillated
  24. defibrillated reblogged this from nursingisinmyblood
  25. littlemissuy reblogged this from ucsdhealthsciences
  26. nursingisinmyblood reblogged this from medicalexamination
  27. kaptain-kandy reblogged this from ucsdhealthsciences
  28. lopsidedpoolside reblogged this from ucsdhealthsciences
  29. alis345 reblogged this from ucsdhealthsciences
  30. pan-chow reblogged this from ucsdhealthsciences

About

News from UC San Diego Health Sciences
Media Contacts: 619-543-6163
HealthSciComm@ucsd.edu

Blogroll

  • oupacademic
  • neurosciencestuff
  • pubhealth
  • awomaninscience
  • nursefocker
  • md-admissions
  • medindia
  • cranquis
  • scientificillustration
  • azspot
  • mothernaturenetwork
  • nursingmonkeymomma
  • fyeahmedlab
  • missmdisme
  • huffingtonpost
  • psychotherapy
  • kenobi-wan-obi
  • seltzerlizard
  • natgeofound
  • codeit
  • tballardbrown
  • comedycentral
  • scienceyoucanlove
  • queerability
  • alscientist
  • scientificthought
  • kqedscience
  • ohscience
  • cancerninja
  • wnyc
  • bbglasses
  • latimes
  • healthcareinfoguide
  • fastcompany
  • madsweat
  • futureofscience
  • aspiringdoctors
  • mindblowingscience
  • katiecouric
  • newyorker
  • molecularlifesciences
  • denverpost
  • boston
  • inothernews
  • medresearch
  • publicradiointernational
  • instagram
  • sdzoo
  • dystrophin
  • currentsinbiology
  • abcworldnews
  • buzzfeed
  • forum-network
  • theweekmagazine
  • therumpus
  • exploratorium
  • longform
  • rollingstone
  • newsweek
  • nprfreshair
  • pbstv
  • laboratoryequipment
  • npr
  • htdeverything
  • thevancouversun
  • nbcnightlynews
  • ari-abroad
  • statedept
  • theonion
  • mathcat345
  • think-progress
  • nbcnews
  • theatlantic
  • wayfaringmd
  • jtotheizzoe
  • dodgemedlin
  • yahoonews
  • nprinterns
  • theskygazer
  • ucsdspecialcollections
  • pozmagazine
  • robotmuesli
  • prochoiceamerica
  • breakingnews
  • sdzsafaripark
  • explore-blog
  • officialssay
  • laweekly
  • journalofajournalist
  • onaissues
  • infographicjournal
  • pacificstand
  • prnewswire
  • usagov
  • ucsdmedialab
  • thisissandiego
  • usnews
  • wired
  • tmagazine
  • doctorswithoutborders
  • mashablehq
  • nydailynews
  • pulitzercenter
  • amnhnyc
  • thenewrepublic
  • nprglobalhealth
  • columbusdispatch
  • kateoplis
  • lakeconews
  • newswatchtv
  • surfnrunnr
  • peacecorps
  • nypl
  • plannedparenthood
  • sesamestreet
  • cenwatchglass
  • guardian
  • austinstatesman
  • sciencenetlinks
  • yaleuniversity
  • medicalstate
  • soupsoup
  • colchrishadfield
  • actgnetwork
  • shortformblog
  • today
  • smithsonianmag
  • todaysdocument
  • post-mitotic
  • themedicalchronicles
  • breakingblog
  • sciencesoup
  • scinerds
  • psydoctor8
  • thescienceofreality
  • huffpostscience
  • cnbc
  • whitehouse
  • highcountrynews
  • scienceisbeauty
  • reuters
  • thisisfusion
  • newshour
  • photojojo
  • ucsdcancer
  • artandsciencejournal
  • msnbc
  • 3rdofmay
  • nprradiopictures
  • galindoyadira
  • markcoatney
  • skunkbear
  • thedailyshow
  • libertasacademica
  • mediclopedia
  • robertreich
  • usatoday
  • bbsrc
  • staff
  • ucresearch
  • pritheworld
  • unicef
  • washingtonexaminer
  • michiganengineering
  • neurolove
  • bostongyrig
  • csmonitor
  • motherjones
  • ottawahealth
  • minnpost
  • doublejack
  • ucsdcrossculturalcenter
  • shortyawards
  • wnycradiolab
  • science-and-logic
  • medicalschool
  • pbsthisdayinhistory
  • hospitalreina
  • sciencechicks
  • americanpublicmedia
  • brookhavenlab
  • discoverynews
  • ziyadnazem
  • scipak
  • nocturnalnurse
  • nysci
  • tedx
  • nurse-on-duty
  • sciencenote
  • jayparkinsonmd
  • ladyjournos
  • poptech
  • ucsdcareerservicescenter
  • mediamed
  • brainmtters
  • aarp
  • neuroanatomyblog
  • nprontheroad
  • articulomortis
  • science
  • poynterinstitute
  • timelightbox
  • artpoweratucsd
  • timemagazine
  • matthewkeys
  • paraphyletic
  • upworthyinsider
  • ucsd
  • topherchris
  • oh4theloveofscience
  • fuckyeahneuroscience
  • pneupnurse
  • utnereader
  • biocanvas
  • joshherigon
  • fuckyeahcardiovascularsystem
  • bitesizedbiology
  • bobedwardsradio
  • medethicslady
  • phdr
  • picturedept
  • fuckyeahnervoussystem
  • sci-fact
  • nationalpost
  • goodideapublichealth
  • carlzimmer
  • vetstail
  • chronicleofhighered
  • wgbhnews
  • ruled-by-secrecy
  • anaofta
  • tumblmd
  • life
  • dailymedical
  • oceanportal
  • ahfspeakout
  • captain-nitrogen
  • lookslikescience
  • genannetics
  • clearscience
  • thecoloradopursuit
  • artneuroscience
  • auditoryinsomniac
  • blamoscience
  • scishow
  • bio-sustain
  • information101
  • sciencephotolibrary
  • rubylipstick1
  • itsjustcharli
  • stemcellculture
  • houseofmind
  • scotthensley
  • a-science-blog
  • cheatsheet
  • bklynmed
  • bartholomewfromthesun
  • salon
  • wellcomebrains
  • aljazeera
  • globeandmail
  • kpcc
  • princeton-medbloro
  • blue-lights-and-tea
  • geneticist
  • couturecourier
  • reportingonhealth
  • ucsfbioengineering
  • coolhealthinfographics
  • thedailywhat
  • villagevoice
  • nbclatino
  • y2ycenter
  • ajebsary
  • realcleverscience
  • ohyeahdevelopmentalbiology
  • guardiancomment
  • timesopinion
  • scientificbritain
  • lifescienceexperiment
  • adschu
  • drwhitehall
  • poptechlabs
  • tokenladyscientist
  • washingtonpostinnovations
  • mountainlake
  • everythingmedical101
  • sdcms
  • mpbntech
  • kusp
  • natgeo